Spinach Quinoa Salad with Water Chestnuts

By: Megan @olivesnthyme

Trying to eat more colors in your diet? This salad is the perfect start! Filled with colorful ingredients and flavor, it can be enjoyed year round. 

Prep Time: 
10 minutes
Servings: 
6
Ingredients: 

3 cups leftover cooked quinoa*, cooled
2 oranges, peeled and cut into chunks
2 cups fresh baby spinach leaves
1 can Reese Sliced Water Chestnuts, drained
1/2 cup dry roasted cashews
The seeds from half a pomegranate

For the vinaigrette: 
1/4 cup DaVinci extra-virgin olive oil
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp unpasteurized honey
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp fresh thyme
1 tsp fresh rosemary
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper

Directions: 
1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the cooked quinoa, orange chunks, spinach leaves, sliced water chestnuts, roasted cashews and seeds from half a pomegranate.
2. In a small container or measuring cup, combine the evoo, acv, Dijon mustard, honey, minced garlic, fresh herbs, salt and pepper and mix vigorously with a whisk, until well combined and slightly emulsified.
3. Pour the vinaigrette over the salad and toss gently to combine.
4. Serve immediately or, if time permits, place your salad in the fridge for a couple of hours to allow all the delicious flavors to meld and fully develop.
5. Leftovers will keep in the refrigerator for up to a couple of days.

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